Be Quiet

Hi all, this is a poem I wrote inspired by the day I’ve had. I woke up this morning and spontaneously decided to go up to Dublin for a few hours (I know, I’m a bad cripple not giving notice). So I rang the train station – no answer. Rang Athlone, Portarlington, Dublin – no answer. Frustrated, I did what any rational being would do and took to Twitter, making a complaint to the @IrishRail page. They never answered, but it was retweeted about ten times, with many in disbelief that because I didn’t give notice that there was a real chance I wouldn’t be on the train.

As I watched the responses coming in on Twitter, I started to feel ashamed. Maybe I’d taken it too far this time. Maybe I was starting to cross the  line from well-meaning activist to downright troublemaker. But then it occurred to me that if it was someone else, a fellow wheelchair user, I’d be the first to cause a stink. And that if we don’t cause a fuss, we will continue to be overlooked.

Anyway, Tullamore train station must’ve been notified because, half an hour after my tweet, the kind man there answered and promised me the assistance I needed. I felt simultaneously smug and stupid, and embarrassed to have caused such hassle.

But I am not hassle. I am equal. And I deserve to be treated as such.

Keep Quiet

Sssh
Keep quiet
Don’t make a fuss
All you ever do is complain
Things really aren’t that bad for you people.
Imagine if you had been born
Sixty years ago
You may never have known the outside
Of the four walls of your bedroom.
You don’t realise how lucky you are –
A home, a job, a family –
We don’t need to hear about
How you fought for every little thing.
Contrary to what you read in fairy tales
At night, when you were younger,
One person cannot change the world.
All your anger does
Is make us all uncomfortable

(I cannot stay quiet.
The silence echoes through our small island.
Rights on paper but not in practice,
Lone wolves howling in the darkness.

I dare not stay quiet
When now there is a generation behind me
Who need to know that it’s okay
To point out things are not okay.
I shall never shrug my shoulders
And pretend to be happy with anything less
Than anything less than true equality).

What would be worse than anger is complacency
And silence, shame of causing a fuss.
Going against what we’ve been taught,
That we must be grateful.

Well, I promise to be grateful
When the simplest things are not made complicated,
When I can come and go as I please,
When the words ‘funding cuts’ don’t make me heave,
When I am equal,
And the lion roaring in my soul is quiet.

Advertisements

Film Review: Sanctuary

It’s been over four years since the RTE documentary that I partook in, Somebody to Love, was aired for the first time. At the time the documentary was recorded, I was going through quite a rough patch emotionally, the mental wounds of having been so heavily scrutinised as a disabled mother had not yet healed. Frankly, I had felt hard done by, the victim of discrimination as a result of my physical impairment. But I was soon reminded, when I watched the documentary that however bad things had been for me, they were much worse for other people.

Living in Ireland all my life, I know that the subject of sexual intercourse has traditionally been taboo, especially sex outside marriage and the notion of freedom of sexual expression. But what if you were living in a country where, for you at least, having sex was illegal? What if you were excluded from exploring your sexual identity because of an outdated law that dictated that sexual intercourse before marriage is essentially rape?

Ireland has a tradition of mollycoddling disabled people, and this culture is slow to change. You may not be aware (as I wasn’t prior to taking part in the documentary) that until recently there was an archaic law called the Lunacy Act 1891 (replaced in 2015 by the Assisted Decision Making Capacity Act) that deemed it illegal for people with intellectual disabilities to have sex outside marriage. This meant that it was assumed that people with intellectual disabilities could not understand or give consent to sexual intercourse.

This is the undercurrent of the film Sanctuary. Sanctuary was originally a play commissioned by the Blue Teapot Theatre Company and written by Christian O’Reilly, who also wrote the film Inside I’m Dancing. Sanctuary is different to any other film I’ve seen depicting the lives of people with disabilities because the cast is largely comprised of people with intellectual disabilities. It’s a refreshing break from the norm of non-disabled actors assuming the roles of people with disabilities; Daniel Day Lewis played Christy in My Left Foot; in Inside I’m Dancing, the two main characters Rory and Michael were played by James McAvoy and Steven Robertson, neither of whom have disabilities in real life. So it was almost a surreal experience to be watching authentic disabled actors on screen.

But don’t be fooled into thinking that the actors were merely given these roles as some kind of tokenistic gesture – these actors are talented and each one inhabited their character with the same dedication as you’d see on any Hollywood screen. The film is set in Galway, with beautiful shots of Galway scenery showcased throughout.  Kieran Coppinger plays Larry, a quirky guy with Down Syndrome and Charlene Kelly plays Sophie, who has an intellectual disability and epilepsy. Both of the actors face the same reality as the characters they play – for them, sex before marriage is illegal. But that’s not going to stop Larry in his quest to have some ‘alone time’ with Sophie!

Tom, the care worker, brings a group of people with intellectual disabilities to the cinema, then leaves them unsupervised to arrange a hotel room for Larry and Sophie with the contents of Larry’s piggy bank. The existence of the piggy bank reminds us how childlike Larry is – or is it simply because he’s treated like a child? As the story progresses, it becomes clear how sheltered Larry has been. Although he’s in his twenties, his mother is disgusted at him for looking at a woman posing in her underwear in a magazine, and she chides him as he leaves the house for bringing too many sweets in his rucksack (she doesn’t know he’s bringing his piggy bank).

Shielding people with intellectual disabilities from the reality of sexual intercourse is bound to have repercussions. Firstly, it doesn’t make people less vulnerable to abuse, something that Sophie can attest to, having been sexually abused in her care home. Secondly, Larry knows that he needs to use a condom ‘to stop Sophie getting pregnant,’ but doesn’t know how to use one, and giving Larry a demonstration is beyond Tom’s comfort zone.  This results in Larry and Sophie having unprotected sex because, as Sophie says, ‘ah sure we couldn’t work it out.’ She smiles at the thought of having a baby with Larry, oblivious to the fact that it is highly unlikely that the State would allow two parents with intellectual disabilities raise a child.

Even though the main story is dark, some parts of the film are hilarious. While Larry and Sophie contemplate breaking the law, their unsupervised companions wander the streets of Galway and end up in comical situations, robbing shops, getting drunk and even getting high! There are some brilliant one-liners too that will put a smile on your face.

Does the film have a happy ending? That’d be telling! All I’ll say is this is a story that you won’t forget, and one that should be talked about long after the closing credits. And that the authenticity of the film – a combination of the plot, the characters and the setting -will change the way you perceive people with intellectual disabilities in a way no other film has thus far.

Sanctuary is available on Amazon. Go buy it – you won’t be disappointed!

 

 

True to Me

I’m sure each and every one of you have been wondering where I’ve been, and have been spending your waking hours pining for another thrilling instalment of this blog. My apologies for my absence, but believe it or not, I’ve been quite busy writing! I completed a ‘Begin Your Novel’ course during the first week of March and realised, to my great disappointment, that what I’d written so far is an unsalvageable mess. So, I did what any self-respecting writer would do and I started again, which has taken up a great deal of my headspace and time. Second time lucky, right…?

I also realised that I’m a cranky old bitch who, while I don’t mind blogging about disability issues, I hate talking about the day-to-day realities of having CP. To be honest, I bore myself so I wouldn’t inflict that on other people. I live as average a life as I can, juggling writing with raising my daughter, and I am lucky insofar as if I can keep some sort of realistic balance and not push myself past the point of redemption, I can get away with keeping a number of balls in the air. I’ve been conditioned to believe, through interaction with other die-hard activists, that it’s society that truly impairs us and that we need to keep challenging these barriers; they, and not our impairments, are the real source of inequality facing disabled people in Ireland.

Lately, however, I’ve been having doubts about my own beliefs, and these doubts have stopped me from blogging as I normally do. Who am I to question the system? Who am I to maintain that it’s society that disables us? Am I too angry? Have I become the proverbial ‘crip with a chip’ that everyone hates? And am I willing to quieten things down a little, stop being so extreme in my loyalty to the pursuit of pure equality and the philosophy of Independent Living (if there even is one any more)?

The answer to the last question is no. And I hate myself for it, I really do.

On Monday night, Tom Milne, Catherine Molloy and I partook in a radio show called the Open Door hosted by the wonderful Ann Marie Kelly on Midlands 103 where the theme of the show was my poem, ‘Fight, Fight, Fight.’ I have to admit that I acted like a pig-headed jackass towards Ann-Marie, which she didn’t deserve because she was very welcoming to me. But I wanted to highlight so many issues facing people with disabilities when she wanted to talk about my impairment and my day-to-day life. I felt frustrated. I didn’t want to be seen as inspirational (lads, I haven’t had a job with a steady wage for three years). I felt ashamed of myself. I mentioned my novel and what I want to achieve writing it but I don’t know if I’ll ever finish it. (It is the main item on my wish-list this year).

And up until an hour ago, I was struggling to find words to explain why I felt so frustrated in myself. Having stared at a blank screen for a whole half hour, I eventually said ‘sod this’ and decided to whittle away the evening hours watching TED talks on YouTube. To make myself feel better, I decided to watch Francesca Martinez’s TED talk in the name of ‘disability research’. Francesca Martinez is a writer, activist and comedienne with Cerebral Palsy who wrote a fantastic autobiography What the **** is Normal? In her talk, Francesca talks about how she spent her teenage years trying to fit in (just like I did) and how her life changed at nineteen when her friend Dylan gave her life changing information: ‘You are you. Yes, you walk differently but no two people walk the same way. You are Francesca, and you can define yourself any way you want.’

Francesca had a light-bulb moment, just as I did watching the TED talk. We spend so much time, she says, trying to conform in a world obsessed with consumerism, being told that if we buy lots of stuff, wear certain things and look and act a certain way, then we will be accepted by our peers. But, as she points out, the illusion this creates isn’t real. And that’s when I realised exactly why I felt torn apart inside.

I want to be real. I want to be seen as a real person. Yes, I am capable of doing some great things but I also reserve the right to be seen as a cantankerous git, someone who doesn’t always get it right. I want to be seen as someone who challenges the status quo, who is willing to take risks. I can’t change the fact that I  have Cerebral Palsy, but if I persevere, I might be able to change people’s misconceptions and eliminate barriers to full inclusion to society.

And I know that those who really matter will completely understand where I’m coming from. In the immortal words of Homer Simpson, ‘I never apologise. I’m sorry, but that’s just the way I am.’