Budget 2020 (Poem)

In case you are wondering what triggered this  poem, there was no further investment into Personal Assistant Services in Budget 2020.

You want us to  be silent –
To just sit here and nod
While you decide what’s best for us
and play at being God.
You ignore our pleas for equality,
For a chance to show our worth,
In fact, you’ve already decided
That we’re nothing more than dirt.
Oh, are these wild accusations?
We respectfully disagree
When all people can get married
while we still struggle to be free.
You treat us like mere children
Who need to be protected
And when we ask for our rights,
Our demands are all deflected.

See, there’s no money for the cripples
To live a decent life
Everyone is struggling
And experiencing strife.
Well, now  we’re calling bullshit
On your half-assed excuses
Because, with the right support,
Us cripples have our uses.
But we’re sick of being grateful
For things we do not want,
Of having to pander to your rules
When we really want to rant.
Our predecessors fought tooth and nail
for our freedom and independence,
and yet we’ve been reduced to the hell
of care plans and needs assessments.
We’re made to be accountable,
to justify our life choices –
the sound of rustling paperwork
drown out our screaming voices.

And now, I see young people
In homes before their time –
Some only in their twenties who
Haven’t even reached their prime.
I just thought I’d give them a mention
While you wait for your fat pension.

Why aren’t people more angry, you ask,
if these issues are so bad?
Could I possibly be exaggerating
Or am I simply going mad?
But I know you know the answer –
People are paralysed by fear
And you must know, deep, deep down
That they won’t say what you want to hear.
So you choose not to listen,
to deny us basic rights
knowing that we are getting tired
of all these uphill fights.

The soft approach isn’t working,
and while I hate to curse
Your fucking lack  of consideration
is making our lives worse.
You wouldn’t put up with this shit –
Why the hell should we?
The revolution is coming,
Even if it has to be started by me.

And so, I call on all my comrades
from all corners of this land
to say we deserve better
and finally take a stand.
Our lives really matter
and deserve proper investment.
We need our PA services
to make us independent.
Get rid of institutions and stop people
From being trapped in their homes.
Invest in our future
Or endure more of these angry poems.

(choice!
Oh choice!
What a luxury)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Post Election Manifesto (Poem)

 

You knocked on our doors wearing a smile,
Said that you wanted to talk for a while,
Assured us that you understood our pain
and that in trusting in you, we had everything to gain.
Then as the door closed with us safe behind
Did we really remain in your minds?
Could you really know what our smiles were hiding
As your manifestos through our letterboxes you were sliding?

Black eyes by a fist who wanted to show who was boss;
An empty cot owned by a mother suffering a loss;
A child who didn’t have breakfast that day;
A young man who can’t make those voices go away;
A lonely but beautiful lady who can’t seem to stop drinking –
When you were ringing those doorbells
What were you thinking?
How were you going to gain our trust
In an Ireland viewed by many as cold and unjust?

You could promise the moon and the stars
But we won’t believe you’re not running up your tab at the bar.
While you attest that things will change in your name
for many of us our reality stays the same,
We still struggle to keep the roofs over our heads
(the lucky of us that is – spare a thought for those in hostel beds),
while working our fingers down to the bone
and spending our evenings feeling overwhelmed and alone.

And that – mo chara – is the biggest problem right there –
That people these days just don’t seem to care!
Young people in nursing homes, families with nothing to eat,
Thousands of people out on the street!
For a country obsessed with unity, all we do is divide –
Never has the gap between ‘rich’ and ‘poor’ been so wide.
And it’s so hard to believe that the country is broke
When the powers that be get six-figure paychecks
(unlike ordinary folk).

So if you are in government, and you’re reading this crap,
It’s time to stop letting Bertie and Enda take the rap,
The future of this country rests in your hands
And we’re counting on you to meet our demands.
Don’t say it’s impossible, that your hands are tied,
Instead think of the tears your people have cried.
One person can’t change the world, it’s true,
But if you speak up for the voiceless, others will too
And maybe, just maybe, our faith in Ireland will renew.

 

Poem: What is Mum?

(In honour of Maternal Mental Health Month)

What is mum but the clay and the moulds
Through which our whole worlds are shaped?
What is mum? The vessel in which
Her children she selflessly creates.
A mum should be gentle and loving,
Firm but understanding, strict yet kind.
Mum’s the one to which we all look to
For love, compassion and empathy to find.

What is mum but this irreplaceable angel
Who seems to be able to juggle it all?
Who rarely seems to get angry or sad
Who loves her children, warts and all?
She carries out her motherly duties,
Her small smile positioned for all to see –
There are always haters and begrudgers
Itching to unveil the real bitch she can be.

What is mum on our island of Ireland,
Where she is no longer shackled to the sink
and yet she cannot find a high-paying job
to make the costs of childcare considerably shrink.
And yet if she chooses to stay home with the sprogs
she’s accused of arsing around –
But how much of their little lives will she miss in the office?
No matter how she tries, she never finds that middle ground.

What is mum but the smelly worn out old sponge
Incapable of holding back her tears any longer?
The woman who beats herself up for all her mistakes
And wishes she could be that little bit stronger?
The woman who worries, overanalyses and criticises
Not knowing that she’s actually great –
She pushes down the hurt, blocks out the voices
That constantly serve to mock and berate.

You see, mums are incredible
But, alas, they’re mere humans too,
And believe me, they are drowning in their own expectations
So they certainly don’t need more added by you.
Every mother out there who loves their kids
Is undoubtedly doing her best,
So with that in mind, leave callousness behind
and let’s give this whole judgemental lark a rest.

Because mothers will never be perfect
(as much as this pains me to say)
but how they perform in their duties
will be down to society at the end of the day.
So let’s not put mums on a pedestal
Where they will feel isolated and alone –
And instead listen, encourage, support and love each other
Whether it’s over coffee, WhatsApp or a natter on the phone.

What is mum?
Only what we allow
Mum to become.

Ten Years On

 

Ten years on,
and how should I feel
other than numb,
Dumb
Lost for words?
I remember that day
It prickles the soul –
The ringing of an office phone
The air was as grey as a gravestone.
A vital organ
Viciously removed
Left me gasping for air.
It didn’t seem fair –
Sure hadn’t we just spoken
A few days before?
It couldn’t be right
And try as I might
I just couldn’t believe
You were
Dead –
Taken by the angels, they said
As this somehow made it okay
That you wouldn’t awaken to see the next day.

Ten years on, and my heart still stops
When Carly Simon is piping through the shops.
A whiff of Samsara, the taste of a good stew
Deceives my mind into looking for you.
and I know after ten years things tend to look rosy
when in fact we both know that things weren’t always cosy
Between us. But I have learned
to abandon that baggage in the lost and found –
It can get very heavy carrying it around.

Ten years on
And I struggle with survivor’s guilt and what-ifs
The empty chair in the corner of my eye
As I slipped on the gold ring
and cooed over the bassinet.
You left when I wanted more:
one more day, one more meal, one more moment.
The anger reverberated through my bones
Resenting you seemed the easiest option
(the right thing is never the easy thing).

Ten years on, and sorrow visits automatically
Like a summer tourist on a return booking.
And I don’t want to feel anything.
My bruised heart clams up, recovering
From past wounds. Time heals
and steals
precious moments.
You are the archetypal mother-in-law,
the doting nana,
The headcase ringing me ten times a day with trivial gossip.
That remains.
Light barges through the fog,
And I hurt:
I remember.

And ten years on
I realise
You can’t be dead
If, within my soul,
You have survived.

Silent voices (poem)

My heart is heavy, my head’s in a spin
As I try to make sense of this mess that we’re in.
Keep quiet you fool, says the voice I tend to ignore,
You’re turning into the most insufferable bore.
Droning on about rights, injustice and division
And how we still aspire to true independent living.

My high-pitched female voice grates on the ears
Of the suited pen pushers who never seem to hear,
and they even seem to relish the thought of those living in fear –
of the voices they’ve silenced down through the years.
And I wonder how long we can keep up the fight
When some of us are forced to end the day at eight at night,
And we know better than to dare to bite
The hand that feeds us.
We are so fucking grateful,
And like stupid obedient pups we will always be faithful
For the reward of the paltry scraps thrown in our direction.
While the powers that be rule our lives at their discretion.

Sometimes I think I go over the top,
And I wish I could get my racing mind to stop.
I wish I didn’t care about fairness, equality or rights
and that I didn’t feel pain in my heart day and night.
If I didn’t know better, I could live in a cloud
Where the voices in my heart wouldn’t sound so loud –
Just become a ‘yes man’ and simply nod my head
And turn off the brain that is now a mangled mess instead.

And on the worst days, when I’m exhausted through and through
I’m so tempted to shrug my shoulders and say “What can I do?”
Do my words make a difference to anything except my bruised ego,
And if we want people to listen, where should we go?
Had I known that gaining more knowledge would bring so much pain
Would I choose the same path had I my time again?

YES, YES, YES

I say yes to equality, for the right to my own mind,
To leaving the shackles of the past behind,
I say yes to being ‘the troublemaker’ who says what can’t be said,
I shout on behalf of those imprisoned in their bed.
I fear complacency and apathy, of accepting as the norm
The nitty-gritty of my life fitting on an A4 form.

My heavy heart’s on fire, my head spins with voices from the past
That say: If you want to change these things, you’d better act, and fast.
 

Poem: Proud

                                                                Proud

Nine years of birthdays with no candles on a cake,
Watching seasons come and go,
The days dragged, but the years flew.
And here I sit once again, with no gifts, no smiles, no hugs
and nothing new to say,
Unless you count saying ‘I miss you’
in a completely different way.

But this year, as well as the usual
Memories that make me smile,
My mind wanders to the fact
We haven’t spoken in a while.
and I need some validation,
to hear you say the answers out loud:
What do you think of me,
Do I make you proud?

I know that when I share this poem
People will say ‘of course!
How could you ever think otherwise?’
And they’ll say it ‘til they’re hoarse.
But you know I’m a cynic –
I never believe until I see –
And to be honest, the fact I’ll never know
Has really been bothering me.

Because I know I wasn’t easy:
At times, I had to be pushed,
Sometimes I was lazy,
And others, far too rushed.
I remember you there goading me,
Telling me to do my best,
and as I got older
Begging me to take some rest.

Then I look at my daughter,
Your grandchild, brave and strong,
and I realise, for all my mistakes,
She’s the one thing I didn’t get wrong.
And when she looks into my eyes
and says ‘Mum, are you proud of me?’
I realise that the answer
Will ever only one thing be.

And this brings some consolation
at this desolate time of year,
A hope that you’re looking down on me
With a smile from ear to ear.
Because though I cannot know for sure
Or hear it said out loud,
I hope you know I try my best,
and I hope that you are proud.

Happy birthday xxx

Nonetheless, I Persist (Poem)

Hi all dedicated Wobbly Yummy Mummy Fans!

For the next six months or so I predict my posting on here will be a tad sporadic, so let me take this opportunity to apologise in advance. I’m studying for the Certificate of Disability Studies in NUI Maynooth, so that’ll be my priority for the next while. But I promise I will update this blog when I can!

In the meantime here is a poem inspired by what I’ve studied so far. Enjoy!

Look at you there, looking at me
As you will me to become whatever you see,
Your handy, capable hero, a huge lump of clay
to be moulded, designed in whatever way
you choose.

Choice.

You say, that if you had the choice
(and you say this so arrogantly, with your own voice)
That no way would you spend the rest of your life
Battling spasms, twisted limbs, pain and yet – in spite
Of this
I persist
To exist.

Do you honestly think that I cannot hear
That I’m the embodiment of all of your fears?
You tell me I’m great, a pure inspiration.
You don’t know my name! But you think
you still have the right to dictate my place
in this so-called ‘great’ nation.

I’m not here to inspire, or make you feel good
and yet I’m not able to live a free a life as I should.
I carry the weight of your negative assumptions on my back
While you casually remind me of all that I lack.

I’ll never walk properly, my hands are weak
And I sound like a drunkard whenever I speak.
Would I not be happier surrounded by ‘my kind’
where my existence wouldn’t push the boundaries of your tiny mind?

I am not scrounger, or inspiration, or hero,
And I won’t be hidden or locked away either.
I’m a Trinity graduate, a writer, a wife
Who, in spite of your assumptions, has a pretty good life.
My ‘incapacitated’ body bore a daughter full of light,
And she knows that, one day, she must continue the fight:
Fight for equality
Fight to be seen as ordinary –
Fight to make mistakes.
I’d rather be seen as flawed than a fake.

You see,
I am not your ‘handy-capable’ hero,
Or an inspiration,
Or a workshy scrounger,
Or a burden, or a waste of space.
This is no tragedy
I am me – spastic, wobbly, gabby
And, ‘in spite’
Of this
I choose
To persist
To exist.

 

Say Nothing (Poem)

(To mark World Mental Health Day, 10/10/2018. Apologies for the corniness – I bashed it out over lunch)

I have this voice inside my head
That often drags me down,
And nothing I can say to it can make the bastard drown.
It tells me that I’m ugly, useless, a waste of space
And worst of all that I’m alone in everything I face.

See, people have bigger problems:
Some people don’t have homes –
Others burdened by their mortgages
Or living on their own.
Some are trapped by violent partners
Others will have no tea.
I live a life of privilege that
This isn’t happening to me.

I couldn’t tell my friends or family –
I couldn’t bear the shame
Of having that stigma of ‘attention seeker’
Attached to my name.
They’ll think that I’m a nutcase
or that I need to take some pills.
I might be told ‘snap out of it’
Or that I’m not really ill.

And so I will say nothing,
Until one day when I wake
I decide that I’ve had as much
Torture as I can take.
What started as a grey cloud
Has turned into a storm
And I can see no way out…

Or maybe… just maybe…
A chink of light will shine through,
When I pluck up the courage
To turn and say to you:
‘I really don’t feel like myself,
I don’t think I’m okay.
I just need you to hold my hand.
I don’t know what else to do or say.’

Because, you see, I could say nothing
And no-one would’ve said
That there’s a bomb about to explode
Inside my messed up head.
The agony is tangible, it eats me up inside.
But I know you cannot help me if I proceed to hide.

And so, I must say something
If only so you know
That if you ever, ever feel the same
I need you to tell me so.
Because silence is a killer,
And pride keeps us apart –
And though the sentiments of this poem seem ‘corny’,
I mean them with all my heart.

One last thought, and then I’ll say goodbye:
There’s often more to things than meets the eye:
Smiles don’t always mean joy, laughter can hide sorrow,
So check in on those you love – don’t leave it til tomorrow.

Poem: Autumn

Autumn is more than a season.
It’s the feeling
Of the world falling down around you –
Yellow and reds:
Heaven and hell.
The closure of warmth,
The fug of turf fires,
A subtle breeze biting your skin,
A familiar darkness closing in.

It’s the season of horror
and hiding behind masks –
A chill leaks into your soul
as you look around
at what is lost.
The silenced children’s voices
now hide behind closed curtains,
Their once glowing faces now white
From the glow of their screens.

Trees sway, unconfident in their nakedness,
Their once plentiful garb strewn to the ground.
Desolate, they wait patiently
For longer days
And a hint of sun.

And so, we go about our days,
Our houses and cars lit to fight the darkness,
Waiting until we see that first green bud
On the old, dependable sycamore tree.

Sarah Fitzgerald, 02/10/2018

 

 

Be Quiet

Hi all, this is a poem I wrote inspired by the day I’ve had. I woke up this morning and spontaneously decided to go up to Dublin for a few hours (I know, I’m a bad cripple not giving notice). So I rang the train station – no answer. Rang Athlone, Portarlington, Dublin – no answer. Frustrated, I did what any rational being would do and took to Twitter, making a complaint to the @IrishRail page. They never answered, but it was retweeted about ten times, with many in disbelief that because I didn’t give notice that there was a real chance I wouldn’t be on the train.

As I watched the responses coming in on Twitter, I started to feel ashamed. Maybe I’d taken it too far this time. Maybe I was starting to cross the  line from well-meaning activist to downright troublemaker. But then it occurred to me that if it was someone else, a fellow wheelchair user, I’d be the first to cause a stink. And that if we don’t cause a fuss, we will continue to be overlooked.

Anyway, Tullamore train station must’ve been notified because, half an hour after my tweet, the kind man there answered and promised me the assistance I needed. I felt simultaneously smug and stupid, and embarrassed to have caused such hassle.

But I am not hassle. I am equal. And I deserve to be treated as such.

Keep Quiet

Sssh
Keep quiet
Don’t make a fuss
All you ever do is complain
Things really aren’t that bad for you people.
Imagine if you had been born
Sixty years ago
You may never have known the outside
Of the four walls of your bedroom.
You don’t realise how lucky you are –
A home, a job, a family –
We don’t need to hear about
How you fought for every little thing.
Contrary to what you read in fairy tales
At night, when you were younger,
One person cannot change the world.
All your anger does
Is make us all uncomfortable

(I cannot stay quiet.
The silence echoes through our small island.
Rights on paper but not in practice,
Lone wolves howling in the darkness.

I dare not stay quiet
When now there is a generation behind me
Who need to know that it’s okay
To point out things are not okay.
I shall never shrug my shoulders
And pretend to be happy with anything less
Than anything less than true equality).

What would be worse than anger is complacency
And silence, shame of causing a fuss.
Going against what we’ve been taught,
That we must be grateful.

Well, I promise to be grateful
When the simplest things are not made complicated,
When I can come and go as I please,
When the words ‘funding cuts’ don’t make me heave,
When I am equal,
And the lion roaring in my soul is quiet.